Using Neutral Density Filters

Shooting Winter scenes isn’t as easy as it looks, especially on a bright, contrasty day. Exposure usually maxes out at around 1/1000 at f/22. Since the exposures are so short a lot of shadow detail gets lost. One way to combat this is using neutral density, or ND filters.

ND filters block light from entering a lens. This makes longer exposures possible in bright, high contrast lighting situations. ND filters come in different graduations, such as 0.3, 0.6 and so on. Each one reduces the light entering a lens by twice the amount.

This is a point of confusion with ND filters, since there are many designations for them. For example, a clear filter, such as a UV zero, reduces light by zero stops. An ND 0.3 filter lets 1/2 of the light pass, so it reduces the light by one stop. An ND 0.6 filter lets 1/4 of the light to pass, so it reduces the light by two stops. This decimal representation is called an Optical Density Number.

ND filters also have “ND 1” numbers. A 0.3 ND filter is ND 101, a 0.6 filter is ND102, and so on.

If you look at the markings on the outside of an ND filter, the designation is almost always given by its optical density number, or ODN. I use this as a guide to correlate the ODN to the number of reduced f-stops.

I made a small ND filter table available as a downloadable PDF. The table is small enough to print out and take with you on shoots. I printed it, cut it out, laminated it and keep it in my camera bag.

ND FILTER TABLE

I was shooting on a cold, clear day this February at a park with a lot of snow on the ground. I shot with my Mamiya 645E using Tri-X at IS0 400. I developed the negatives in Ilfosol 3. Normal exposures tended around 1/1000 shutter speed at f/16 or f/22. Shooting at this speed washes out the highlights and shadow detail, which winds up muddying a black and white negative. Here’ s an example:

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To get more shadow detail I used a 0.6, 0.9 and 2.1 on this shoot.

Here’s a shot using the 0.6 filter. Much better tonal separation and shadow detail.

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Here’s a shot with the 0.9 filter. The 0.9 seemed to work well on this shoot, brining out more subtle shadow detail.

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Here’s a shot with the 1.2 filter, taking the exposure down 4 stops.

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ND filters help on bright days. It takes the exposure down allowing you to capture more shadow detail. I find them especially useful when capturing Winter scenes.

Holga Pinhole, One January Morning in Royal Oak

I went shooting on the edge of downtown Royal Oak, Michigan on a recent January morning. The temperature has been hovering in the low teens since early December and we finally got a small break in the weather- it went into the high thirties, so it was a good morning to go out and shoot.

I loaded the Holga Pinhole with Ilford FP4 (ISO 125) and headed out to Royal Oak, Michigan, where I grew up. Royal Oak offers some decent photographic opportunities, and I shoot there a lot. Today, I first shot at the train stop then took a couple shots downtown, on Washington near Fourth Street

Holga Pinhole cameras, like all Holgas, are quirky. Here’s mine:

PH (1 of 7)

There are exposure guidelines printed on the back of the camera, but they are just that- crude guidelines. for “Fine Weather” the exposure it 1.5 to 3 seconds, for “Overcast” 4-6 seconds, and for “Morning or Dusk” the exposure is 7 seconds on up. I’ve found in general, around 3 seconds or so works for most situations,except for at night. Anything above four or five seconds, you will need a cable release.

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I use a Manfrotto Backpacker Classic tripod when I go shooting with a pinhole, or most other cameras for that matter. It’s light, but not too light and can easily hold a Holga or other small pinhole camera steady, such as a Zero Image 2000. I have yet to use it with my Mamiya 645E, which is a large, fairly heavy medium format camera. I plan to, and will post a review.

As a side note, I have a Zero Image 2000 Deluxe pinhole camera coming soon and will post a review. I’m really looking forward to getting this camera. It’s on its way from Hong Kong as of this writing.

As far as film goes, I use a slower ISO, typically in the 100-125 range whenever I use a pinhole camera. On bright days using a film like Tri-X at ISO 400 the pinhole may only need to be exposed for less than a second, and it’s almost impossible to manage manually. A slower ISO film gives you more time and control when making exposures.

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The first thing I did at the train stop was to throw my Holga cable release in the garbage. It pops apart at the shutter release without fail, no matter what I use to fix it- tape, glue, spit, you name it. It failed on the first exposure, so enough was enough.

Holgas leak light like crazy, and mine is no exception, as shown in the shot below on the lower left. Sometimes it helps an image, sometimes it doesn’t.

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Again, if you’re careful, for a three second or so exposure you don’t really need a cable release if you steady the camera on your tripod when taking your shot.

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Back home I had a terrible time getting the film on the developing reel, which rarely happens. I tried and tried with my plastic reel then gave up and went to my stainless reel and tank. I accidentally exposed the roll to light for an instant, but that was enough to destroy some of the outer exposures. I’ve since ordered an Omega Universal reel, so I’ll see how that works out and post a review.

ROFrame (1 of 1)

It wasn’t the greatest shooting day, but I did manage to get a few decent shots. The benefit is that I got out and shot with the Holga Pinhole. I’m still learning my Holga’s quirky characteristics, since no two Holgas are alike. I’m starting to really value the Holga, since the pinhole version is no longer made and the price is heading upward quickly. If you find one reasonably priced, grab it. Holga Pinholes are becoming far and few between.